Lmao!
worclip:

Cella (2012) by Ecoid 
This project has been launched at Kickstarter
Material: UV Protected Clear Plastic (PVC)

Cella was developed from a green roof research project called “Mosspebble” at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. Because moss gathers all of its nutrients from the air, it doesn’t need soil. However, it requires certain levels of wind, shade and moisture. Instead, we observed that moss seems to thrive on rocks and pebbles – their porous surfaces are perfect for growth. This inspired Cella’s unique design. After four years of careful observation and modification, we’ve perfected it to the lightweight, contemporary model you see now.
Cella’s unique ability to create the optimal microclimate for moss and plug plants make it adaptable to all kinds of environments. The small, organic form of the units make efficient use of space to fit a garden in an urban home or apartment, and can be installed on any surface. There are no limits to your landscaping visions – grow a traditional garden on the floor, or have it climb up the walls and hang from the ceiling.

worclip:

Cella (2012) by Ecoid 
This project has been launched at Kickstarter
Material: UV Protected Clear Plastic (PVC)

Cella was developed from a green roof research project called “Mosspebble” at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. Because moss gathers all of its nutrients from the air, it doesn’t need soil. However, it requires certain levels of wind, shade and moisture. Instead, we observed that moss seems to thrive on rocks and pebbles – their porous surfaces are perfect for growth. This inspired Cella’s unique design. After four years of careful observation and modification, we’ve perfected it to the lightweight, contemporary model you see now.
Cella’s unique ability to create the optimal microclimate for moss and plug plants make it adaptable to all kinds of environments. The small, organic form of the units make efficient use of space to fit a garden in an urban home or apartment, and can be installed on any surface. There are no limits to your landscaping visions – grow a traditional garden on the floor, or have it climb up the walls and hang from the ceiling.

worclip:

Cella (2012) by Ecoid 
This project has been launched at Kickstarter
Material: UV Protected Clear Plastic (PVC)

Cella was developed from a green roof research project called “Mosspebble” at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. Because moss gathers all of its nutrients from the air, it doesn’t need soil. However, it requires certain levels of wind, shade and moisture. Instead, we observed that moss seems to thrive on rocks and pebbles – their porous surfaces are perfect for growth. This inspired Cella’s unique design. After four years of careful observation and modification, we’ve perfected it to the lightweight, contemporary model you see now.
Cella’s unique ability to create the optimal microclimate for moss and plug plants make it adaptable to all kinds of environments. The small, organic form of the units make efficient use of space to fit a garden in an urban home or apartment, and can be installed on any surface. There are no limits to your landscaping visions – grow a traditional garden on the floor, or have it climb up the walls and hang from the ceiling.

worclip:

Cella (2012) by Ecoid 
This project has been launched at Kickstarter
Material: UV Protected Clear Plastic (PVC)

Cella was developed from a green roof research project called “Mosspebble” at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. Because moss gathers all of its nutrients from the air, it doesn’t need soil. However, it requires certain levels of wind, shade and moisture. Instead, we observed that moss seems to thrive on rocks and pebbles – their porous surfaces are perfect for growth. This inspired Cella’s unique design. After four years of careful observation and modification, we’ve perfected it to the lightweight, contemporary model you see now.
Cella’s unique ability to create the optimal microclimate for moss and plug plants make it adaptable to all kinds of environments. The small, organic form of the units make efficient use of space to fit a garden in an urban home or apartment, and can be installed on any surface. There are no limits to your landscaping visions – grow a traditional garden on the floor, or have it climb up the walls and hang from the ceiling.

worclip:

Cella (2012) by Ecoid 
This project has been launched at Kickstarter
Material: UV Protected Clear Plastic (PVC)

Cella was developed from a green roof research project called “Mosspebble” at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. Because moss gathers all of its nutrients from the air, it doesn’t need soil. However, it requires certain levels of wind, shade and moisture. Instead, we observed that moss seems to thrive on rocks and pebbles – their porous surfaces are perfect for growth. This inspired Cella’s unique design. After four years of careful observation and modification, we’ve perfected it to the lightweight, contemporary model you see now.
Cella’s unique ability to create the optimal microclimate for moss and plug plants make it adaptable to all kinds of environments. The small, organic form of the units make efficient use of space to fit a garden in an urban home or apartment, and can be installed on any surface. There are no limits to your landscaping visions – grow a traditional garden on the floor, or have it climb up the walls and hang from the ceiling.

worclip:

Cella (2012) by Ecoid 
This project has been launched at Kickstarter
Material: UV Protected Clear Plastic (PVC)

Cella was developed from a green roof research project called “Mosspebble” at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. Because moss gathers all of its nutrients from the air, it doesn’t need soil. However, it requires certain levels of wind, shade and moisture. Instead, we observed that moss seems to thrive on rocks and pebbles – their porous surfaces are perfect for growth. This inspired Cella’s unique design. After four years of careful observation and modification, we’ve perfected it to the lightweight, contemporary model you see now.
Cella’s unique ability to create the optimal microclimate for moss and plug plants make it adaptable to all kinds of environments. The small, organic form of the units make efficient use of space to fit a garden in an urban home or apartment, and can be installed on any surface. There are no limits to your landscaping visions – grow a traditional garden on the floor, or have it climb up the walls and hang from the ceiling.

worclip:

Cella (2012) by Ecoid 

This project has been launched at Kickstarter

Material: UV Protected Clear Plastic (PVC)

Cella was developed from a green roof research project called “Mosspebble” at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. Because moss gathers all of its nutrients from the air, it doesn’t need soil. However, it requires certain levels of wind, shade and moisture. Instead, we observed that moss seems to thrive on rocks and pebbles – their porous surfaces are perfect for growth. This inspired Cella’s unique design. After four years of careful observation and modification, we’ve perfected it to the lightweight, contemporary model you see now.

Cella’s unique ability to create the optimal microclimate for moss and plug plants make it adaptable to all kinds of environments. The small, organic form of the units make efficient use of space to fit a garden in an urban home or apartment, and can be installed on any surface. There are no limits to your landscaping visions – grow a traditional garden on the floor, or have it climb up the walls and hang from the ceiling.

aperture24:

lemon meringue pie

  1. Camera: RICOH IMAGING COMPANY, LTD. GR
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/40th
  4. Focal Length: 18mm

astrodidact:

Kepler-186f-art

“This is really a tip-of-the-iceberg discovery,” said study co-author Jason Rowe, an astronomer at the SETI Institute in Mountain View, Calif., who spent a year analyzing data gathered by NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope that led to finding the planet known as Kepler-186f.

"The press still thinks [global warming] is controversial. So they find the 1% of the scientists and put them up as if they’re 50% of the research results. You in the public would have no idea that this is basically a done deal and that we’re on to other problems, because the journalists are trying to give it a 50/50 story. It’s not a 50/50 story. It’s not. Period."
Neil deGrasse Tysonpodcast interview (via fourteendrawings)

reallifescomedyrelief:

viforcontrol:

beautifuloutlier:

gwydtheunusual:

too—weird-to-live:

zafojones:

Circus Tree: Six individual sycamore trees were shaped, bent, and braided to form this.

how the hell do you bend and braid a tree

Actually pretty easy. Trees don’t reject tissue from other trees in the same family. You bend the tree to another tree when it is a sapling, scrape off the bark on both trees where they touch, add some damp sphagnum moss around them to keep everything slightly moist and bind them together. 
Then wait a few years- The trees will have grown together. 

You can use a similar technique to graft a lemon branch or a lime branch or even both- onto an orange tree and have one tree that has all three fruits.

Frankentrees.

As a biologist I can clearly state that plants are fucking weird and you should probably be slightly afraid of them.

On that note! At the university (UBC) located in town, the Agriculture students were told by their teacher that a tree flipped upside down would die. So they took an excavator and flipped the tree upside down. And it’s still growing. But the branches are now the roots, and the roots are now these super gnarly looking branches. Be afraid.

But Vi, how can you mention that and NOT post a picture? D:

image

[source]

lonelychairsatcern:

#lonelychairsatcern chair at the window overlooking the works #b17 #CERN

astrodidact:

Very cool!!